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U

Unemployed

An unemployed person is in the working-age population (15 years and over) and, during the week ended 3 March 2013, was without a paid job but was available for work, and:

  • had actively sought work in the four weeks ended 3 March 2013, or
  • had a new job to start within the next four weeks.

If a person’s only job search method was to read job advertisements then they are not considered to be actively seeking work.

See also ‘Actively seeking work’.

Unemployment rate

The unemployment rate gives the number of unemployed people as a percentage of the labour force.

Unitary authority

A unitary authority is a territorial authority (district or city) which also performs the functions of a regional council. New Zealand has five unitary authorities: Gisborne district, Nelson city, Tasman district, Marlborough district, and the new Auckland Council.

Chatham Islands council is not usually considered a unitary authority, although it acts as a regional council for the purposes of the Resource Management Act 1991.

Unpaid activities

Unpaid activities covers activities performed in the four weeks before 5 March 2013, without payment, for people living either in the same household, or outside.

Unoccupied dwelling

For census use a dwelling is defined as unoccupied if it is unoccupied at midnight and at all times during the next 12 hours following midnight on the night of the data collection.

Unoccupied dwellings may be classified as 'empty' or 'residents away'.

An unoccupied dwelling is classified as 'empty' if it clearly had no current occupants and new occupants are not expected to move in on, or before, census night. Unoccupied dwellings that are being repaired or renovated are defined as empty dwellings. Unoccupied baches or holiday homes are also defined as empty dwellings.

A dwelling is classified as having ‘residents away’ where occupants of a dwelling are known to be temporarily away and are not expected to return on, or before, census night.

Unrelated

Unrelated people have a non-familial relationship.

See also ‘Non-familial relationship’.

Urban area

Urban areas are statistically defined areas without administrative or legal basis. Their hierarchical subdivision is into:

main urban areas

  • secondary urban areas
  • minor urban areas.

Together, the populations in main, secondary, and minor urban areas comprise the statistically defined ‘urban’ population of New Zealand. The urban area classification is designed to identify concentrated urban or semi-urban settlements without the distortions of administrative boundaries.

See also ‘Main urban area’, ‘Minor urban area’, ‘Rural area’ and ‘Secondary urban area’.

Usual residence

Usual residence is the address of the dwelling where a person considers themselves to usually reside.

It is recommended that these guidelines be followed in cases where usual residence is not self-defined.

  • Dependent children, who board elsewhere to attend primary or secondary school, and return to the home of their parent(s) or guardian(s) for the holidays, usually reside at the address of their parent(s) or guardian(s).
  • Tertiary students usually reside at the address where they live while studying. If they give up their usual residence in the holidays (eg terminate the lease on a flat or give up their hostel room) and return to the home of their parent(s)/guardian(s) during the holidays, their usual residence over that period would be the home of their parent(s)/guardian(s).
  • Children in shared care usually reside at the place where they spend more nights, or if they spend equal amounts of time at each residence, they usually reside at the place where they were on census night.
  • People who are in rest homes, hospitals, prisons, or other institutions usually reside where they consider themselves to live; this may include the institution.
  • A person whose home is on any boat, ship, or vessel permanently located in any harbour shall be deemed to usually reside at the wharf or landing place (or main wharf or landing place) of the harbour.
  • A person from another country who has lived the 12 months before 5 March 2013 in New Zealand, or has the intention of living in New Zealand for 12 months or more, usually resides at his or her address in New Zealand (as in external migration).
  • People who spend equal amounts of time residing at different addresses, and cannot decide which address is their usual residence, usually reside at the address they were at on census night.
  • If none of the above guidelines apply, the person usually resides at the address where they were on census night.

Usual residence five years ago

Usual residence five years ago is a person’s usual residence on 5 March 2008.

Usual residence five years ago indicator

The usual residence five years ago indicator is a person’s usual residence five years ago in relation to their usual residence on 5 March 2013. It provides information on the migration of people within New Zealand and of those who have arrived from overseas.

Usual residence five years ago summary

Usual residence five years ago summary provides high-level geographic information, such as the count of people that now live in a different usual residence in the same regional council area. The summary combines the ‘usual residence five years ago indicator’, and the ‘usual residence five years ago’, with the ‘usual residence’ on census night.

Usual residence imputation

Imputation is necessary if usual residence on census night is missing, so that everyone is assigned to a specific meshblock. This allows electoral populations to be calculated on the basis of usual residence. Any person initially coded to a level higher than the meshblock will have a meshblock imputed for usual residence.

See also ‘Imputation’ and ‘Meshblock’.

Usual residence indicator

The usual residence indicator describes the relationship between a person’s usual residence and their census night address. The categories for usual residence indicator are:

  • same as census night address
  • elsewhere in New Zealand
  • overseas
  • no fixed abode.

Usual residents

Usual residents are people who usually live in the surveyed dwelling.

There are two types of usual residents: people who usually live in the dwelling and were present on census night, and those who usually live there but were absent at census night (absentees).

There are two types of absentees: those who were elsewhere in New Zealand on census night and those who were overseas then.

Usual residents in non-private occupied dwellings

Usual residents in non-private occupied dwellings are people who gave a non-private dwelling as their usual residence on census night.

See also ‘Occupied non-private dwelling’.

Usual residents in occupied dwellings

Usual residents in occupied dwellings are people who gave a private or non-private occupied dwelling as their usual residence on census night, or people who were recorded as absent from a private occupied dwelling.

Usual residents in private dwellings

Usual residents in private dwellings are people who were surveyed at home in a private occupied dwelling on census night or who were recorded as absent from a private occupied dwelling.

Usually resident population

See ‘Census usually resident population count’.

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