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Access to telecommunication systems

Access to telecommunication systems relates to the telecommunication systems available for use by the household in the dwelling. It is a multi-response question, which means a household can have access to any, all, or none of these telecommunication systems. Anything that is disconnected or broken, or that can be used only for work is excluded.

Over three-quarters of households have Internet access

The percentage of households that have access to the Internet increased to 76.8 percent in 2013 – up from 60.5 percent in 2006, and 37.4 percent in 2001.

More households had access to telecommunication systems in 2013. The proportion with no access was just 1.6 percent – down from 2.0 percent in 2006 and 3.6 percent in 2001.

The proportion of households with access to a cellphone increased to 83.7 percent in 2013 – up from 74.2 percent in 2006. (In 2001 this category was combined with the access to a (landline) telephone category.)

Access to a (landline) telephone, at 85.5 percent in 2013, declined from 91.6 percent in 2006 and 96.3 percent in 2001.

Household access to a fax machine has continued to fall, to reach 14.6 percent in 2013 – down from 26.0 percent in 2006 and 25.3 percent in 2001.

Figure 10

Graph, Access to telecommunication systems (total responses), 2001, 2006, and 2013 Censuses.

Auckland region has highest percentage of households with Internet access

Of the regions, Auckland has the highest percentage of households with access to the Internet (81.6 percent), followed by Wellington (80.8 percent) and Canterbury (78.3 percent).

Gisborne has the lowest percentage (63.3 percent), followed by Northland (68.0 percent).

In 2013, the Wellington region had the highest percentage of households with access to a cellphone/mobile phone (85.4 percent), followed by Auckland (84.8 percent) and Canterbury (84.4 percent).

Regions that are mostly rural had the highest percentage of households with no access to telecommunication systems. The highest proportion was in the West Coast (3.4 percent), followed by Gisborne (3.1 percent).

Queenstown-Lakes district has highest percentage of households with Internet access

Among the territorial authorities, the percentage of households with access to the Internet was:

  • highest in the Queenstown-Lakes district, at 87.5 percent – up from 69.9 percent in 2006
  • lowest in the Wairoa district, at 54.9 percent – up from 38.9 percent in 2006.

Figure 11

Graph, Households with Internet access, by territorial authority area, 2013 Census.

For households with access to a cellphone/mobile phone:
  • Selwyn district had the highest proportion, at 88.1 percent – up from 79.0 percent in 2006.

For households with no access to telecommunication systems:

  • Opotiki district had the highest proportion, at 6.3 percent – down from 9.5 percent in 2006
  • Selwyn district had the lowest proportion, at 0.7 percent – the same as in 2006.

Internet access highest for couple with children households

‘Couple with children’ households were the most likely to have access to the Internet, at 91.9 percent in 2013 – up from 80.6 percent in 2006.

Table 3
Access to telecommunication systems (total responses)(1) by one-family households

2013 Census

One-family household

 

No access to telecommunication systems 

Access to a cellphone/ mobile phone 

Access to a telephone 

Access to a fax machine 

Access to the Internet 

Total households stated 

Number 

Couple only

2,280

336,489

355,206

 81,978

 326,667

 388,245

Couple only and other person(s)

336

27,810

 25,992

 4,113

 28,686

 32,634

Couple with child(ren)

 2,241

 365,424

 369,744

 72,570

 366,441

 398,880

Couple with child(ren) and other person(s)

297

 29,631

 29,916

 5,307

 28,980

 33,288

One parent with child(ren)

 4,041

 113,955

 100,326

 10,461

 91,944

 133,008

One parent with child(ren) and other person(s)

1,014

 27,654

 23,514

 2,277

 21,843

 32,358

Total one-family household

 10,212

 900,963

 904,704

 176,706

 864,561

 1,018,410

 Percent 

Couple only

 0.6

 86.7

 91.5

 21.1

 84.1

 …

Couple only and other person(s)

 1.0

 85.2

 79.6

 12.6

 87.9

 …

Couple with child(ren)

 0.6

 91.6

 92.7

 18.2

 91.9

 …

Couple with child(ren) and other person(s)

 0.9

 89.0

 89.9

 15.9

 87.1

 …

One parent with child(ren)

 3.0

 85.7

 75.4

 7.9

 69.1

 …

One parent with child(ren) and other person(s)

 3.1

 85.5

 72.7

 7.0

 67.5

 …

Total one-family household

 1.0

 88.5

 88.8

 17.4

 84.9

 …

1. Households reporting access to more than one type of telecommunication system were counted in each stated category. Therefore percentages do not add up to 100.
Symbol: … not applicable
Source: Statistics New Zealand

Just over half of one-person households now have Internet access

One-person households had the lowest percentage of access to the Internet of all household types, but the percentage was up. Over half (51.5 percent) of these households had access in 2013, up from 33.1 percent in 2006.

Other multi-person households have lowest access to a (landline) telephone

Only 65.3 percent of other multi-person households had access to a (landline) telephone in 2013 – down from 83.9 percent in 2006. Multi-person households are made up of people living together who do not form a family, such as siblings or flatmates.

Figure 12
Graph, Access to telecommunication systems (total responses) for selected household compositions, 2013 Census.

Households that don’t own their home less likely to have Internet access

Households that did not own their own home were less likely to have access to the Internet, at 66.1 percent in 2013 – up from 47.5 percent in 2006.

These households are also less likely to have access to a (landline) telephone, at 69.7 percent in 2013 – down from 80.8 percent in 2006.

Figure 13 Graph, Access to telecommunication systems (total responses) by tenure of household, 2013 Census.

Households owning their dwelling through a family trust have highest access to Internet

Households that owned their dwelling through a family trust had the highest access to the Internet, at 87.2 percent in 2013 – up from 74.6 percent in 2006.

These households are also more likely to have access to a (landline) telephone, at 95.5 percent, and more likely to have access to a cellphone/mobile phone, at 88.1 percent.

Access to Internet increases with household income

Access to the Internet increased with increasing household income. It ranged from 45.7 percent for households with income of $20,000 or less, to 95.5 percent for households with an income of $100,001 or more.

Table 4
Access to telecommunication systems (total responses)(1) by grouped household income 

2013 Census

Grouped household income

No access to telecommunication systems

Access to a cellphone/ mobile phone

Access to a telephone

Access to a fax machine

Access to the Internet

 Total households stated

Number 

$20,000 or less

 7,512

 94,860

 100,917

 10,017

 64,425

 140,868

$20,001–$30,000

 3,006

 100,626

 118,839

 12,060

 75,792

 141,741

$30,001–$50,000

 3,672

 189,477

 192,012

 28,368

 162,417

 229,266

$50,001–$70,000

 1,962

 166,908

 164,577

 27,831

 157,101

 190,431

$70,001–$100,000

 1,323

 212,097

 211,320

 38,652

 211,872

 235,029

$100,001 or more

 891

 333,876

 334,374

 76,590

 344,859

 361,101

Total stated

 18,366

 1,097,841

 1,122,039

 193,518

 1,016,466

 1,298,436

 Percent  

$20,000 or less

 5.3

 67.3

 71.6

 7.1

 45.7

 …

$20,001–$30,000

 2.1

 71.0

 83.8

 8.5

 53.5

 …

$30,001–$50,000

 1.6

 82.6

 83.8

 12.4

 70.8

 …

$50,001–$70,000

 1.0

 87.6

 86.4

 14.6

 82.5

 …

$70,001–$100,000

 0.6

 90.2

 89.9

 16.4

 90.1

 …

$100,001 or more

 0.2

 92.5

 92.6

 21.2

 95.5

 …

1. Households reporting access to more than one type of telecommunication system were counted in each stated category. Therefore percentages do not add up to 100. 
Symbol: … not applicable
Source: Statistics New Zealand

Access to a cellphone and (landline) telephone also increases with household income

Access to the other telecommunication systems also increased with increasing household income.

For example, in 2013, household access to a cellphone/mobile phone ranged from:

  • 67.3 percent for households with an income of $20,000 or less, to
  • 92.5 percent for households with an income of $100,001 or more.

 Household access to a (landline) telephone ranged from:

  • 71.6 percent for households with an income of $20,000 or less, to
  • 92.6 percent for households with an income of $100,001 or more.

Figure 14 
Graph, Access to the Internet by grouped household income, 2013 Census.
 

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