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Census night address

Census night address is the meshblock of the dwelling where a respondent is located on census night. For passengers on overnight trains and buses, it is recommended that census night address be the destination of the passenger.

Refer also to 'meshblock’.

Census night population count

The census night population count of New Zealand is all people counted in New Zealand on census night. This count includes visitors from overseas who are counted on census night, but excludes New Zealand residents who are temporarily overseas on census night.

The census night population count includes all people in New Zealand on census night, 7 March 2006, who were:

  • on New Zealand soil
  • on a vessel in New Zealand waters, or
  • on a passage between New Zealand ports.

Overseas residents and other people in diplomatic residences in New Zealand, including housekeeping staff, uniformed military personnel or members of diplomats' families are included in the census night population count. Also included are foreign military personnel and their families located in New Zealand on census night (including foreign warships in New Zealand territorial waters on census night).

New Zealand military, naval and diplomatic personnel and their families located outside New Zealand on census night are not included.

At a subnational level, the census night population count refers to all people who are in that place on census night. The Auckland census night population count, for example, includes overseas visitors and New Zealand residents who are temporarily visiting Auckland, but excludes people who usually live in Auckland but are elsewhere on census night. This differs from the census usually resident population count, which refers to people who usually live in Auckland.

Census usually resident population count

The census usually resident population count of New Zealand is all people counted in New Zealand on census night, excluding overseas visitors and New Zealand residents temporarily overseas.

The census usually resident population count of an area in New Zealand is a count of all people who usually live in that area and are present in New Zealand on census night. This count excludes visitors from overseas, visitors from elsewhere in New Zealand, and residents temporarily overseas on census night.

For example, a person who usually lives in Christchurch city but was in Wellington city on census night will be included in the census usually resident population count of Christchurch city and also will be included in the census night population count of Wellington city. They will be excluded from the census night population count of Christchurch city and from the census usually resident population count of Wellington city.

Child in a family nucleus

To be a 'child in a family nucleus' a person must usually reside with at least one parent, and have no partner or child(ren) of their own living in the same household. Note that 'child(ren) in a family nucleus' can be a person of any age.

Child(ren) in a family nucleus is/are divided into two subgroups: 'dependent child(ren)' and 'adult child(ren)'.

Refer also to 'parent', 'adult child' and 'dependent child'.

Cigarette smoking behaviour

Cigarette smoking refers to the active smoking of one or more manufactured or hand-rolled tobacco cigarettes, from purchased or home-grown tobacco, per day, by people aged 15 years and over.

The term 'smoking' refers to active smoking behaviour, that is, the intentional inhalation of tobacco smoke. Smoking does not refer to or include passive smoking (the unintentional inhalation of tobacco smoke).

Cigarette smoking does not include:

  • the smoking of tobacco in cigars, pipes and cigarillos
  • the smoking of any other substances, herbal cigarettes or marijuana, for example, or
  • the consumption of tobacco products by other means, such as chewing.

Cigarette smoking behaviour is a cyclical topic that was first asked about in the 1976 Census. It was repeated in the 1981, 1996 and 2006 Censuses.

City

A city, as defined in the Local Government Act 1974, must have a minimum population of 50,000, be predominantly urban in character, be a distinct entity and a major centre of activity within the region.

Civil union status

A civil union is a legal relationship recognised in law in New Zealand. The Civil Union Act 2004 came into force on 26 April 2005, with the first ceremonies celebrated on 29 April 2005. Civil unions are an alternative to marriage and have an equivalent legal status. To be joined in a civil union, a couple must have gone through a formal ceremony and registration process. A civil union may be entered into by same-sex or opposite-sex couples.

Combined parental income for couples with child(ren)

Combined parental income for couples with child(ren) is derived by aggregating the total personal income for the couple.

Refer also to 'grouped total combined parental income for couples with child(ren)', 'total personal income' and 'sources of personal income'.

Community board

Provision to create community boards was set up at the time of the 1989 local government restructuring. Their purpose is to administer the affairs of communities with a population of not less than 1,500 within rural, urban or metropolitan districts of a territorial authority. A community board's functions, powers and duties are delegated at the discretion of its parent territorial authority and these may differ from community board to community board. The boundaries of community boards may be reviewed prior to each triennial local government election. The provisions for such a review are contained in the Local Electoral Act 2001.

Refer also to ‘territorial authority’.

Consensual union

The relationship between two people usually resident in the same dwelling who:

  • share mutual concern for each other
  • have a degree of economic, social and emotional interdependence, and
  • consider their relationship to be akin to marriage or civil union.

Refer also to ‘civil union status’.

Constituency

Regional council constituencies were established in November 1989. They are subdivisions of regional council areas that are created on population-based criteria to be voting areas within regional councils.

Regional council constituencies are defined at meshblock level, and do not coincide with area units. Constituencies are required to reflect communities of interest and their boundaries, and, so far as is practicable, coincide with those of territorial authorities or wards.

The boundaries of regional council constituencies may be reviewed prior to each triennial local government election. The provisions for such a review are contained in the Local Electoral Act 2001.

Refer also to ‘regional council’, ‘meshblock’, ‘area unit’, ‘territorial authority’ and ‘ward’.

Couple

Two people who usually reside together and are legally married or in a civil union, or two people who are in a consensual union.

Refer also to ‘civil union status’ and ‘consensual union’.

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