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Water Safety New Zealand

Water Safety New Zealand (WSNZ) is the national organisation responsible for preventing injury and drowning, through water safety education.

Water Safety New Zealand's website

 

Data collection: Drownbase

Name of data collection

Drownbase

Purpose / objective

Drownbase is used by WSNZ to analyse trends, promote drowning prevention, and identify priorities for drowning prevention activities.

Description of key content, including relevance to injury

Drownbase collates all of the deaths from drowning in New Zealand. This includes deaths from drowning in the workplace. Drownbase also collects some information about non-fatal drownings.

Start date of data collection

Drownbase was developed in 1994 and contains records of all drownings since 1 January 1980. Data about non-fatal drownings began in 2004.

Frequency of data collection

Data is entered daily.

Methods of data collection

Drownbase collates drowning deaths as advised by police reports and coroner files. Information about non-fatal drowning incidents is received directly from the Ministry of Health.

Description of the injury data collected

Fatal and non-fatal (hospitalisation) drowning incidents. WSNZ monitors annual numbers of drowning deaths, broken down by age, sex, ethnicity, month, region, activity prior to drowning, and place of occurrence.

Coding system used to classify the injury data

Hospitalisation data uses ICD coding. 

Access

Publicly available data

WSNZ publishes an annual drowning report. A range of factsheets, produced from the analysis of Drownbase, are also available on the WSNZ website. Users can submit a request form for more data.

Links to data and reports

Drownbase fact sheets 

Statistics and research  This includes the latest annual drowning report.

 

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