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Work-related injury targets at a glance: 2008–15

This page presents the three indicators used for monitoring the government’s targets to reduce work-related injuries.

In 2012, the New Zealand government set a target to reduce work-related fatalities and serious injuries by at least 25 percent by 2020, with an interim target of a 10 percent reduction by 2016 (Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, 2016).

Work-related injury indicators

This section provides the key results for each indicator.

Age-standardised rate of work-related fatal injuries

The latest provisional data shows the rate of work-related fatal injuries has decreased since 2012–14 and is now below the 2018–20 target (see figure 1).

The rate is age-standardised to adjust for any changes in the age distribution over time. It uses a three-year moving average.

This indicator is taken directly from Serious injury outcome indicators: 2000–15. It combines data from Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) work-related fatal injury claims and WorkSafe New Zealand notifications for work-related fatalities.

See Serious injury outcome indicator reports for more information on this indicator.

Figure 1

Graph, Work-related fatal injuries, age-standardised rates, 2008 to 2015.

Age-standardised rate of work-related serious non-fatal injuries

The latest provisional data shows that the rate of work-related serious non-fatal injuries has decreased since 2014 and is now below the 2016 interim target (see figure 2).

The rate is age-standardised to adjust for any changes in the age distribution over time.

This indicator is taken directly from Serious injury outcome indicators: 2000–15. It links data from ACC claims for work-related injury with hospitalisation data from the Ministry of Health.

See Serious injury outcome indicator reports for more information on this indicator.

Figure 2

Graph, Work-related serious non-fatal injuries, age-standardised rates, 2008 to 2015.

Rate of claims for work-related injuries resulting in more than a week away from work

The latest provisional data shows little change since 2014 in the rate of work-related injuries resulting in more than a week away from work. This rate has been above the baseline since 2014 (see figure 3).

This indicator is derived from the same data used for Injury statistics – Work-related claims. These figures are for claims accepted by ACC for work-related injuries. They are restricted to injury claims with weekly compensation payments greater than zero and exclude gradual process claims.

See Injury statistics – Work-related claims: 2015 for more information on this data source.

Figure 3

Graph, Claims for work-related injuries resulting in more than a week away from work, rates, 2008 to 2015.

More information

Work-related injury targets at a glance – DataInfo+ 
Definitions used in this release.

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and WorkSafe New Zealand 
The MBIE and WorkSafe New Zealand websites provide more information about work-related injury.

Health and safety reform 
Information about the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015.

Towards 2020: Progress towards the Government’s Working Safer fatality and serious injury target 
An update on progress towards the 2020 target.

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge the contribution of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and WorkSafe New Zealand in developing this release.

References

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (2016). Working safer – Reducing work-related fatalities and injuries: Progress toward the 2020 targets (PDF, 1.04 MB). Retrieved from www.mbie.govt.nz.

Downloadable tables

The following tables are available in Excel format from the ‘Available files' box on the right-hand side of this page. If you have problems viewing the files, see opening files and PDFs.

  1. Work-related fatal injuries, 2008–15
  2. Work-related serious non-fatal injuries, 2008–15
  3. Claims for work-related injuries resulting in more than a week away from work, 2008–15

Published 31 May 2017

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