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Life expectancy

Information about life expectancy (average length of life) and patterns of mortality (death) and survival at various ages.

Use the links below to find the statistics you need. 

Information releases

Explore our latest life expectancy statistics.

New Zealand Period Life Tables 
These complete period life tables indicate life expectancy and the mortality and survival experience at each single year of age for the total New Zealand, Māori, non-Māori, and Pacific male and female populations. They are typically derived every five years for a three-year period centred on a census year.

New Zealand Abridged Period Life Table 
Abridged period life tables indicate life expectancy and the mortality and survival experience at selected ages for the total New Zealand male and female populations. They are derived annually and give an indication of trends until the complete period life tables are available.

New Zealand Cohort Life Tables
These complete cohort life tables indicate life expectancy and the mortality and survival experience at each single year of age for the total New Zealand male and female populations born in each year from 1876. They are updated and extended annually. 

Births and Deaths 
Information on the number of births and deaths registered in New Zealand, and selected fertility and mortality rates.

Data

Analyse the numbers.

Infoshare 
Select the following categories from the Infoshare homepage for data about life expectancy from period life tables:

Subject category: Population
Groups: Demography Life Expectancy and Demography Subnational Life Expectancy

Find out more about Infoshare.

Period life tables 
Downloadable Excel tables including complete period life tables and summary results from 1950–52.

Abridged period life tables (subnational) 
Subnational trends in mortality and survival for male and female populations. These tables are available for all 16 regions and most territorial authority areas, and are typically produced every five years for a three-year period centred on a census year. More-detailed results are available on request (phone 0508 525 525 toll-free, or email demography@stats.govt.nz).

How long will I live? 
Calculator combining historical data from 1876 with the latest national population projections to give an indication of the age you're likely to live to.

Life expectancy indicator 
One of the NZ social indicators (He kete tatauranga).

Reports and articles

Explore information we’ve gathered from research and analysis.

Forecasting mortality in New Zealand (published 2014) 
Paper describing a new method for formulating mortality assumptions that was implemented in official New Zealand population projections in 2012.

New Zealand life tables: 2005–07 (published 2009)
Report analysing period life tables for the total, Māori, and non-Māori populations for the period 2005–07. The report also includes analysis of causes of death, information on the mortality and survival of people in different subnational areas, and a description of methods. 

A history of survival in New Zealand: Cohort life tables 1876–2004 (published 2006)
Report presenting the methods and results of tracing the mortality and survival experience of people born from 1876 to 2004. The report contributes to understanding the changing mortality experience of New Zealanders. 

New Zealand life tables: 2000–02 (published 2004)
Report analysing period life tables for the total, Māori, and non-Māori populations for the period 2000–02. The report also includes analysis of causes of death, information on the mortality and survival of people in different subnational areas, and a description of methods. 

Information about data

Get technical information such as classifications used, survey design, and a glossary of statistical terms.

Information about the life tables

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