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Global New Zealand – International Trade, Investment, and Travel Profile: Year ended June 2009
Key points

New Zealand’s merchandise exports increased 7.5 percent for the year ended June 2009, and were valued at $43.0 billion. The largest increase in export value was in meat, which increased 18.1 percent ($885 million) for the year. Mineral fuels had the largest decrease, down 19.0 percent ($505 million), with price contributing significantly to this movement.

The total value of New Zealand’s imports for the year ended June 2009 was $46.1 billion, up 3.7 percent from $44.5 billion in the June 2008 year. The increase in import values was due to a variety of commodities, including aircraft (up 75.2 percent or $593 million), and electrical machinery (up 14.5 percent or $547 million). The increase in total imports for the year ended June 2009 was partly offset by a 25.7 percent ($1.4 billion) decrease in vehicles, and a 75.0 percent ($478 million) decrease in ships.

Exports

  • Australia continued to be New Zealand’s principal export market, totalling $9.7 billion, and contributing 22.6 percent of total exports for the year ended June 2009. The United States and Japan were New Zealand’s second and third-largest export markets, receiving $4.8 billion and $3.4 billion, respectively. China was New Zealand’s fourth-largest export destination, with exports valued at $3.4 billion – an increase of 60.7 percent ($1.3 billion) from the year ended June 2008.
  • Exports to APEC economies accounted for 69.0 percent of New Zealand’s total exports and were worth $29.7 billion in the year ending June 2009. The European Union accounted for 13.8 percent ($5.9 billion) of total exports.
  • Dairy products were New Zealand’s largest export earner in the June 2009 year, accounting for 21.1 percent of total merchandise exports and valued at $9.1 billion. Meat and wood were our two next-largest export products, accounting for 12.8 and 5.4 percent of total exports, respectively. Mineral fuels (5.0 percent) and machinery (4.3 percent) were also key components of New Zealand’s goods export portfolio in the year ended June 2009.

Imports

  • Australia remained New Zealand’s largest source of merchandise imports in the year ended June 2009, accounting for 17.6 percent of total imports. Total imports from Australia were valued at $8.1 billion, a 6.5 percent decrease from the June 2008 year. China was New Zealand’s second-largest source of imports, with a 14.3 percent increase in this same period and a value of $6.7 billion, or 14.4 percent of total imports. Other major sources of imports for New Zealand were the United States, Japan, and Germany, which respectively accounted for 10.1, 7.8, and 4.3 percent of total imports.
  • Imports from APEC economies were valued at $33.2 billion and accounted for 72.0 percent of total imports in the year ended June 2009. Imports from the European Union were valued at $7.9 billion for the June 2009 year, and were 17.1 percent of total imports.
  • New Zealand’s highest-valued imported product in the year ended June 2009 was mineral fuels, worth $7.3 billion and accounting for 15.9 percent of total imports. Other significant imports included machinery ($5.8 billion), electrical machinery ($4.3 billion), and motor vehicles ($4.0 billion). Services In the year ended June 2009, New Zealand’s service exports were worth $12.4 billion, down $467 million from the June 2008 year. New Zealand imported services to the value of $13.4 billion in the year ended June 2009, up $392 million from the June 2008 year.

Services

  • In the year ended June 2009, New Zealand’s service exports were worth $12.4 billion, down $467 million from the June 2008 year. New Zealand imported services to the value of $13.4 billion in the year ended June 2009, up $392 million from the June 2008 year.

Overseas visitors

  • Overseas visitor arrivals numbered 2.5 million in the year ended June 2009. This was a 2.5 percent decrease from the June 2008 year. The largest sources of visitors to New Zealand in the year ended June 2009 were Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States, China, and Japan.

 General issues

The commodity tables show the principal markets for New Zealand’s exports (and some imports) of several product groups, including agriculture, non-agriculture, dairy, meat, fruit and vegetables, forestry, machinery, and textiles, clothing and footwear. Economic groupings, and the geographic country aggregations that make up the geographic regions used in the text, are defined in the appendices at the end of this publication. Other definitions, for example the services definitions, are those used by Statistics New Zealand, based on standard International Monetary Fund criteria. A summary of these also appears at the end of this publication.

Re-exports

Re-exports record goods brought into New Zealand and exported without a ‘substantial transformation’. The 50 percent value added is used as a yardstick to measure ‘substantial transformation’; above that level, the goods are classified as domestic exports. Trans-shipment goods are not included. Goods that are re-exported will have previously figured in some form in the import statistics.

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