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Investigating different measures of energy hardship in New Zealand explores options for developing a measure of energy hardship. Once we have an agreed measure, we can ensure quality data about energy hardship is collected over time.

We have developed these indicators because of the need for information on energy hardship in New Zealand. There has been growing concern about the health and well-being impacts of living in a cold, damp home, especially for infants and retired people. However, a possible policy response is dependent on the provision of regular measures of energy hardship in order to monitor the situation. In this paper we explore a range of different indicators of energy hardship, which we can obtain from existing data. Energy hardship has also been referred to in the literature as energy poverty, fuel poverty, or energy insufficiency.

We found that we can create some indicators of energy hardship using data from the Household Economic Survey (HES) and the Census of Population and Dwellings. These are largely based on measures used in Europe and Australia. We aim to estimate the number of households and people who are experiencing some form of energy hardship.

The paper will also look at the characteristics of households and people that are experiencing some form of energy hardship. We will explore whether there has been any change over time in the proportion or characteristics of these households.

Read this paper online, or download the PDF from the 'Available files' box. If you have problems viewing the files, see opening files and PDFs.

See also Keeping warm a hardship for almost three in ten households – media release.

Citation
Stats NZ (2017). Investigating different measures of energy hardship in New Zealand. Retrieved from www.stats.govt.nz.

ISBN: 978-1-98-852815-1 (online)
Published 1 September 2017

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