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Te Kupenga 2013 (English) – corrected
Embargoed until 10:45am  –  06 May 2014
Key facts

Tirohia tēnei whārangi i te reo Māori 

Statistics New Zealand’s first survey on Māori well-being, Te Kupenga, showed that in 2013:

  • 373,000 (70 percent) Māori adults said it was at least somewhat important for them to be involved in things to do with Māori culture. Just 10 percent said it was not important.

When asked about tikanga:

  • 89 percent of Māori adults said they knew their iwi. This was the most common aspect of Māori tribal identity or pepeha that Māori knew.
  • 62 percent of Māori adults had been to their ancestral marae and 34 percent had done so in the last 12 months.

When asked about te reo Māori:

  • 257,500 (55 percent) Māori adults had some ability to speak te reo Māori; that is, they were able to speak more than a few words or phrases in the language. This compares with 153,500 (42 percent) in 2001.
  • 50,000 (11 percent) Māori adults could speak te reo Māori very well or well; that is, they could speak about almost anything or many things in Māori.
  • Between 2001 and 2013 there was a large increase in the proportion of younger Māori who reported some ability to speak te reo Māori.
  • 164,500 (35 percent) Māori adults reported speaking some te reo Māori within the home.

When asked about whanaungatanga:

  • 83 percent of Māori adults said their whānau was doing well or extremely well.
  • 84 percent of Māori adults had face-to-face contact with whānau they didn’t live with, at least once in the last four weeks.
  • Half of all Māori adults said their whānau consisted of fewer than 11 people. Just 5 percent said their whānau consisted of 61 or more people.
  • Most Māori defined their whānau by whakapapa. Almost all Māori (95 percent) stated their whānau included parents, partner, children, and brothers and sisters.

See the Māori cultural well-being in 2013 poster for a visual representation of the survey's key findings. 

Liz MacPherson
Government Statistician, 6 May 2014
ISBN 978-0-478-40887-4 (online)

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