• Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Census snapshot: Māori

Key Statistics - article, April 2002, p. 9

Highlights key findings about Māori from the Census of Population and Dwellings held on 6 March 2001.

Census snapshot: Māori1

The thirty-first New Zealand Census of Population and Dwellings was held on 6 March 2001. The following snapshot highlights some of the key findings from tables prepared for the National Summary topic-based report published at the end of March 2002.

Overview

One in seven people were counted in the Māori ethnic group, an increase of 21 percent since 1991, according to 2001 Census results.

Most Māori continue to live in the northern regions. Nearly 90 percent live in the North Island and nearly 60 percent of Māori live in Northland, Auckland, Waikato and the Bay of Plenty. However, the number of Māori people in the South Island has increased 38 percent since 1991 to reach 64,650.

While one in four people of Māori ethnicity speak the Māori language, nearly one half of Māori language speakers are under 25 years of age.

The median annual income for Māori adults was $14,800 for the year ended 31 March 2001, with Māori between 45 and 49 years of age having the highest median income for all Māori at $21,800. One in twenty Māori adults have an annual income of more than $50,000.

The Māori population is ageing, with the median age of people of Māori ethnicity increasing to 22 years from 20 years in 1991. Whereas 10 years ago 1 in 40 Māori people were aged 65 years and over, 1 in 30 are now in this age range.

Highlights

For the census usually resident population count.

  • 1 in 7 people (526,281) in New Zealand were of Māori ethnicity.
  • Nearly 9 in 10 people of Māori ethnicity live in the North Island.
  • The median age of people of Māori ethnicity is 22 years.
  • 1 in 4 people of Māori ethnicity speak the Māori language.
  • The median annual income for adults of Māori ethnicity was $14,800.
  • Over 1 in 5 adults of Māori ethnicity had a post-school qualification.
  • The largest iwi was Ngāpuhi.

Location

  • Nearly 9 in 10 people of Māori ethnicity live in the North Island, a similar proportion to 1991.
  • Nearly 6 in 10 people of Māori ethnicity live in the four northern regions of Northland, Auckland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty.
  • 1 in 4 people (127,629) of Māori ethnicity live in the Auckland region.
  • 9 in 20 people in the Gisborne region are of Māori ethnicity.
  • 1 in 6 people of Māori ethnicity live in rural areas.
  • The count of people in the South Island of Māori ethnicity increased by 38 percent from 46,680 in 1991 to 64,650 in 2001.
  • The count of people in the Nelson region of Māori ethnicity increased by 89 percent from 1,707 in 1991 to 3,219 in 2001.
    Graph, Māori as a Proportion of Each Regional Council Population.

Demographics

  • 1 in 7 people (526,281) in New Zealand were of Māori ethnicity.
  • There has been an increase of 21 percent for the count of people of Māori ethnicity between 1991 and 2001.
  • The Māori population count at the 1901 Census was 45,549.
  • There were 95.7 males of Māori ethnicity for every 100 females in 2001, a decrease from 97.2 in 1991.
  • The median age of people of Māori ethnicity is 22 years, an increase from 20 years in 1991.
  • More Māori people are in older age groups, with just under 1 in 30 people of Mori ethnicity aged 65 years and over, compared with 1 in 40 in 1991.
  • 3 in 8 people of Māori ethnicity are aged under 15 years, a similar proportion to 1991.
  • The Gisborne region had the largest proportion of people of Māori ethnicity aged 65 years and over, at 1 in 19.
  • The Tasman region had the highest proportion of people of Māori ethnicity aged under 15 years, at 4 in 10.
  • 99 percent of people of Māori ethnicity were born in New Zealand.
    Graph, Age Sex Pyramid for Māori Ethnic Population.

Language and religion

  • 1 in 4 (130,482) people of Māori ethnicity speak the Māori language.
  • Nearly one half of Māori language speakers were aged under 25 years.
  • 1 in 4 people of Māori ethnicity speak more than one language.
  • Over 1 in 3 people of Māori ethnicity in the Gisborne region speak the Māori language, with just under 1 in 3 in Bay of Plenty and Northland.
  • 98 percent of people of Māori ethnicity who stated a religious affiliation were Christian.
    Graph, Māori Language.
    The main Christian denominations were:
    Table, Christian Denominations for Māori Ethnic Population.

Income and work

  • The median annual income for adults of Māori ethnicity was $14,800 for the year ended 31 March 2001.
  • The median income for males was $18,600 – more than $5,000 above that of $13,200 for females.
  • The highest median income for people of Māori ethnicity was in the 45 to 49-year age group at $21,800.
  • The Auckland and Wellington regions shared the highest median income for people of Māori ethnicity at $18,700.
  • 1 in 20 adults of Māori ethnicity had an annual income of more than $50,000.
  • 6 in 10 adults of Māori ethnicity had an annual income of $20,000 or less.
  • 3 in 8 adults of Māori ethnicity had received a government benefit in the 12 months before the 2001 census.
  • 56 percent of adults of Māori ethnicity were employed in 2001, compared with 43 percent in 1991.
  • The most common occupation group for people of Māori ethnicity was service and sales workers, with 1 in 6 (28,635) workers.
  • The most common occupation group for Māori females was service and sales workers (23 percent) and for Māori men plant and machine operators and assemblers (25 percent).
  • The manufacturing industry had the most workers of Māori ethnicity, with 1 in 6 (29,142), a decline from 1 in 4 (26,004) in 1991.
  • Nearly 3 in 10 workers of Māori ethnicity in the Gisborne region were in the agriculture, forestry and fishing industry group.
  • Nearly 9 in 20 workers of Māori ethnicity in the communication services industry group were in the Auckland region.

Qualifications

  • School Certificate in one or more subjects (or National Certificate level 1) was the highest school qualification for most adults of Māori ethnicity, with 1 in 5 adults (65,211) – the same proportion as in 1991.
  • Over 1 in 5 adults of Māori ethnicity had a postschool qualification.
  • 1 in 6 adults of Māori ethnicity had a vocational qualification (such as New Zealand Certificate of Engineering), while 1 in 21 had a degree or higher qualification as their highest post-school qualification.
  • The Otago region had the largest proportion of people of Māori ethnicity with tertiary qualifications as their highest qualification, with 3 in 11.
  • The most common field of study for post-school qualifications for people of Māori ethnicity was teaching, with 2,988 people.

Iwi

  • 1 in 6 people (604,110) are of Māori descent. (Descent is a different concept to that of ethnicity, which is related to cultural identification.)
    For those people of Māori descent, the largest iwi were:
    Table, Iwi Counts.
    Graph, Iwi Counts.

More information

The counts for this 2001 Census snapshot are taken from tables prepared for the National Summary topic-based report published at the end of March 2002. Detailed counts are also available in a series of tables. These tables are here. Further information about the 2001 Census of Population and Dwellings can be found here.

Footnote

1 This snapshot was prepared by Frank Nolan of the Social and Population Statistics Group of Statistics New Zealand.

Printable version

The downloadable file is in Adobe Acrobat format. If you do not have the Adobe Acrobat Reader you may download the reader to view or print the contents of this file.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+