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Structural change and the 65+ population

Structural Change and the 65+ Population contains a series of articles that give a statistical overview of the impact of compositional change in the age structure of New Zealand’s population, with a special emphasis on those aged 65 years and over (the 65+ population). It draws on information from a number of statistical collections as well as New Zealand and international research.

Social and demographic changes

Several shifts in the life stages of New Zealanders have occurred in the last three decades. Some of these shifts include increasing numbers of people choosing to:

  • stay in education longer
  • enter the labour force later
  • wait longer before leaving home
  • delay starting a family
  • retire later.

Coupled with these shifts, other behaviour changes have also occurred, such as:

  • family sizes becoming smaller
  • more people:
    • remaining single
    • re-partnering
    • migrating to New Zealand
  • more diversity in family living arrangements and housing options (such as apartments and lifestyle blocks).

These social and demographic changes have profound implications for policy makers, planners, administrators, and others interested in population ageing.

Structural Change and the 65+ Population will provide information about how structural change is affecting the experience of ageing and altering the support networks within communities. We will continue to add articles on related topics to this page.

Structural Change and the 65+ Population articles

Articles are available for download above.

Links to related work

New Zealand’s 65+ Population: A statistical volume

Labour Force Participation of New Zealanders Aged 65 Years and Over, 1986–2006 

Feedback welcome

Statistics New Zealand welcomes comments from readers on the content and format of this series of articles. Please email Bill Boddington at info@stats.govt.nz.

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