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Read the standard online, or download and print the PDF and tables from ‘Available files’ above. If you have problems viewing the files, see Opening files and PDFs.

Classification

To search the classification, or code small volumes of data interactively, use the Classification Code Finder.

Use a coding tool to code large volumes of data by downloading the Classification Coding System.

Rationale

Country is a key variable for determining population and economic statistics that relate to birthplace, country of residence, overseas trade, and balance of payments data.

Classification of country

There are two types of country classifications: the four-numeric classification and the two-alpha classification.

Statistics NZ maintains the four-numeric classification according to the numeric codes and names assigned by the UN Statistical Division and the International Organization for Standardization.

The four-numeric classification of a country is a hierarchical classification with three levels. There are nine major groups in level 1, 27 minor groups in level 2, and 244 countries in level 3. There are no residual categories as supplementary codes are used instead. The supplementary codes are explained in Classification and coding process.

The two-alpha classification of country is a flat classification containing 246 countries.

Details of the current versions of the the classifications are:

Country four-numeric classification code

Classification Country – New Zealand Standard Classification 1999 – four-numeric
Abbreviation NZSCC4N99
Version V12.0
Effective date 01/01/2014

 

Country two-alpha classification code

Classification Country – New Zealand Standard Classification 1999 – two-alpha
Abbreviation NZSCC2A99
Version V13.0
Effective date 01/01/2014
Published 2 April 2015
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