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About Classification Code Finder

What is the Classification Code Finder?
How do I know which classification to select?
What is a classification?
How is the Classification Code Finder different from the coding tool I got on a CD from Statistics New Zealand?

Search

What does a search by keyword do?
Can I include my own keywords or search terms?
What does a search by code do?
Can I code a number of things at once?
What can I do if I don't find the code I want?

Results

What does sort by relevance mean?
Why do my search results have a ‘more’ link at the end of the description?
Why do my results appear to be random?
What does nec mean?
What does nfd mean?

Browse

What does browse the classification hierarchy do?
Why do some classifications have multiple levels?

Help from our Information Centre Staff is available toll-free 0508 525 525 in New Zealand, or +64 4 931 4600 outside New Zealand. Alternatively, you can send us feedback.

About Classification Code Finder

What is the Classification Code Finder?

The Classification Code Finder is a tool that allows you to explore classifications in several ways. You can enter a keyword to find a classification category, search for a category by its code, or browse the classification structure using the hierarchy option.

How do I know which classification to select?

A number of classifications are available through the Select a classification drop-down box. If you are unsure about the classification name or context, either:

  • hover the mouse over the abbreviation to display the full name of the classification, or
  • select the classification and click on the About this classification link.

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What is a classification?

A statistical classification is created to group a set of related categories in a meaningful, systematic and standard format.

For more information see Classifications and related standards.

How is the Classification Code Finder different from the coding tool I got on a CD from Statistics New Zealand?

The Classification Code Finder (CCF) is a web-based, interactive tool that is useful for coding small volumes of data, and viewing results within the classification hierarchy. The CD version of the Classification Coding System (CCS) is a stand-alone application that must be installed to a PC or a network, and is suitable for processing large numbers of variables or survey responses. The CD version of CCS is now available as a downloadable application, see Download the Classification Coding System. Both the web-based CCF and the downloadable CCS use the same coding engine and methodology, but have different functionality. For a more detailed comparison of the two coding products, please see the following comparison table. 

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Search

What does a search by keyword do?

Searching by keyword allows you to search a classification using common words or terms. Results are displayed with the closest match at the top of the list.

Can I include my own keywords or search terms?

The Classification Code Finder has a comprehensive data dictionary. The majority of search terms should generate adequate results. Additional search terms can only be added by Statistics New Zealand. If you feel a search term is not sufficiently covered, please send us feedback.

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What does a search by code do?

Searching by code allows you to search for a specific code or to find related codes starting with the same characters. Note that the system expects the code to match from the start of the code.

As an alternative the user can browse the complete classification through the Browse classification hierarchy link.

Can I code a number of things at once?

The Classification Code Finder has been designed to be an interactive web-based tool. Only one search term can be entered at a time. For multiple searches you need to repeat the search process for different keywords. For a batch or auto coding solution you can Download the Classification Coding System.

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What can I do if I don't find the code I want?

If you are having trouble finding the code or category that you want, you may like to try some of the following:

  • Check you have selected the correct classification for your search.
  • Try variations of a word. For example, search for ‘fish’, ‘fishing’, ‘fisher’.
  • Try a different or more common keyword, for example, instead of ‘card shuffler’ try ‘card dealer’ or ‘casino dealer’.
  • Try a more specific keyword, for example, instead of 'engineer' try 'structural engineer'.
  • For code searches, check that you are using the appropriate coding structure by browsing the hierarchy. For example, for Industry, all the codes start with a letter e.g. A123. For Occupation codes begin with a number e.g. 123.
  • Browse the classification hierarchy. This view allows you to expand the hierarchy and view different levels of the classification.
  • Send feedback about the tool or any problems you are having. We endeavour to respond promptly to any queries.
  • Phone the Statistics New Zealand Information Centre on 0508 525 525 (toll-free in New Zealand) or +64 4 931 4600 from outside New Zealand.

Results

What does sort by relevance mean?

The results are scored against the keyword or search term used. The results are displayed with the closest match at the top of the list. When you search by code, sorting by relevance is the same as sorting the results in code order.

Why do my search results have a ‘more’ link at the end of the description?

The more link opens the classification hierarchy of the code selected, in a new window. This gives the full context of the code, and in some cases gives additional definitions or exclusions.

Why do my results appear to be random?

The coding engine behind the Classification Code Finder uses complex data dictionaries and a heuristic weighting methodology. All results have a relationship to the original search term even if at times it may appear to be vague. To assist with the usefulness of the tool, results are sorted in order of relevance.

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What does nec mean?

'nec' stands for 'not elsewhere classified'.

This is a residual category used for responses for which no appropriate category exists. Such responses are usually infrequent or unanticipated.

For example in the Ethnicity classification below '12199 British nec' can be used to capture responses like 'Gibraltarian', 'Pictish' or 'St Helenian', which are clearly British ethnic groups, but that do not appear as specific classification categories:

Ethnicity Classification 
1 European 
        10 European nfd 
        11 New Zealand European 
        12 Other European 
                    121 British and Irish 
                                12100 British nfd 
                                12112 Channel Islander 
                                12113 Cornish 
                                12114 English 
                                12116 Irish 
                                12119 Scottish 
                                12120 Shetland Islander 
                                12121 Welsh 
                                12199 British nec

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What does nfd mean?

'nfd' stands for 'not further defined'.

This is used in hierarchical classifications for responses containing insufficient detail to be classified to the most detailed level of a classification, but which can be classified to a less detailed category further up the hierarchy.

For example in the Ethnicity classification below '12100 British nfd' can be used for responses like 'Brit' or 'British':

Ethnicity Classification
1 European 
        10 European nfd 
        11 New Zealand European 
        12 Other European 
                    121 British and Irish 
                                12100 British nfd 
                                12112 Channel Islander 
                                12113 Cornish 
                                12114 English 
                                12116 Irish 
                                12119 Scottish 
                                12120 Shetland Islander 
                                12121 Welsh 
                                12199 British nec

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Browse

What does browse the classification hierarchy do?

When you click on the Browse classification hierarchy link, a new page opens with the classification hierarchy displayed at the highest level of the classification. For classifications with more than one level a plus symbol will appear allowing the user to step down into the classification.

In some situations an additional layer of information is also available. This is displayed as a >>more link on the right side of the classification description. This indicates there is a definition or exclusion associated with this code. Click on the >>more link to display the additional text, and click on hide<< to collapse the detail. Additional detail can be at any level of the classification.

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Why do some classifications have multiple levels?

A classification structure is composed of one (flat classification) or several levels (hierarchic classification). Generally they make it easier to drill down to detailed information or to aggregate up to meaningful outputs.

For example, in the occupation classification there are 5 levels:
Level        Name                      Example
1             Major Group             1 Managers
2             Sub-Major Group      12 Farmers and Farm Managers
3             Minor Group             121 Farmers and Farm Managers
4             Unit Group               1213 Livestock Farmers
5             Occupation              121312 Beef Cattle Farmer 

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